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Great News From Liberia

The news from Liberia is wonderful: the last known Ebola patient has been discharged from treatment! [NYT 3/6/15] This doesn’t make Liberia “Ebola free” – that requires 42 days (twice the incubation period) with no new cases. Many contacts are still being monitored, and others may not have been identified, so Liberia may still have to deal with a few more local outbreaks before it can declare victory. Also, so long as Ebola continues in neighboring countries the disease may be brought back to Liberia by travelers (though note this heartening item about an effective Liberian border control operation: [IOM 2/4/15]). And the risk of an unrelated jump to a human from an animal reservoir will continue indefinitely. Nevertheless, this is a moment to be savored!

Update 3/24/15: A new patient has been identified in Liberia, who probably was infected by her boyfriend, an Ebola survivor. [NYT 3/24/15]. This is disappointing, but the fact that only one instance has come to light suggests that this mode of transmission is rare.

Ongoing Transmission in Sierra Leone and Guinea

Sierra Leone initially showed a similar pattern of precipitous decline in patients, but since the end of January weekly cases have stabilized between 60 and 100. [WHO 3/4/15] This is better than exponential growth, but it’s not on track to ending the epidemic. Guinea didn’t have as sharp a peak, but it also hasn’t experienced such a dramatic improvement: about 50 cases are continuing to arise each week. In both countries the steady rate of new cases implies an Effective Reproduction Rate of about 1. Pushing this down just a little would eventually end the epidemic, while letting it rise would allow exponential growth to resume. Liberia has shown that it’s possible to snuff out the epidemic, but Sierra Leone and Guinea are not yet following in Liberia’s footsteps.

I don’t claim to know how Liberia did it, but somehow the Effective Reproduction Rate dropped to about 1 in September, then fell much lower from October on. Sierra Leone’s peak and fall were similar, but occurred about two months later, and the decline has now leveled out. While the opening of new treatment centers certainly helped in recent months, my own best guess is that the main factor in both countries is that people simply “got religion.” That is, a large enough fraction of Liberians came to accept that Ebola is caused by a virus, not a curse; that people who fall ill need to be cared for in safe settings, rather than at home; and that corpses need to be handled with extreme care. I suppose that a comparable fraction of Sierra Leone’s population reached similar conclusions, but the epidemic is now continuing there and in Guinea within sub groups that haven’t fully accepted the message.

Devilish Details

The last Ebola patient in Liberia, Beatrice Yardolo, came from a worrisome cluster of cases “in a community called St. Paul’s Bridge, located in what was one of the biggest Ebola hot spots in Monrovia, New Kru Town.” [NYT 3/6] The New York Times reported that, “[t]he outbreak was unusually violent and far-reaching, in part because it involved criminal gangs that did not cooperate with the authorities and fears that it could be spread through a knife fight with one member nicknamed Time Bomb.” Even more troubling was the fact that known contacts on several occasions left Monrovia for other parts of the country. [FrontPageAfrica 2/3/15] One of the escaped contacts died in Margibi County, and required the tracking of 256 contacts there. [GNN Liberia 2/4/15]

Ebola came into the Yardolo family from Beatrice’s cousin Steve, who probably became infected at an Ebola treatment center where he worked. [AllAfrica 3/6/15]  Steve infected several other members of the family, eventually including his daughter Amanda. Beatrice took responsibility for Amanda’s care, but again and again Amanda was mis-diagnosed and rejected from Ebola treatment centers. Beatrice was left responsible for bathing and otherwise caring for her. After Amanda died Beatrice went immediately to a treatment center started showing symptoms, which probably saved her life.

Ebola didn’t end in Liberia because people behaved well, but because the strategies of isolation and contact tracing worked despite much bad behavior and many mistakes.

Sierra Leone’s experience is vividly described in another New York Times piece. [NYT 2/18/15] The epidemic was re-ignited by three sick fishermen who landed in a poor area of Freetown in early February. Two dozen people in the area ended up contracting Ebola from this initial group before transmission was brought under control. A quarantine was imposed but was frequently broken. One shopkeeper fell ill but was afraid to go to a hospital in Freetown. Instead he broke quarantine and traveled three hours to his home village, where he visited a traditional healer, then died. He caused the infection of some 42 people in the district.

Endemic Ebola?

Ebola is still being actively transmitted in Sierra Leone and Guinea, and may yet recur in Liberia, or spread to other countries. But the Liberian experience gives every reason to hope that the techniques that worked there can eventually end this epidemic altogether. The possibility must be acknowledged, however, that the epidemic will continue indefinitely, neither growing exponentially nor definitively ending. In this case Ebola would become “endemic” to West Africa — just one of the typical diseases that people get there. I can’t disprove this — indeed it seems to be happening now in Guinea — but I have several reasons for doubting that this will happen with the current strain of Ebola:

  • It’s too deadly. A cluster of a less lethal disease might go relatively unnoticed, but this can’t happen with Ebola. The deaths of family and friends, one after another, cannot be ignored. The presence of Ebola in a community will not be tolerated for long.
  • Its incubation period is too short. A disease that takes months or years to emerge (e.g. AIDS, leprosy, tuberculosis) can hide in a human population, but Ebola emerges quickly, or not at all.
  • It’s only transmitted from person to person. Aside from the wild animal reservoir (discussed below) Ebola appears to be transmitted only from person to person. A disease that could also infect some more familiar animal, like fleas or rats, could hide in the animal reservoir and reemerge unpredictably. Fortunately, Ebola shows no sign of doing this.
  • It’s only transmitted by direct contact. Fortunately, Ebola isn’t airborne; it’s transmitted only by direct contact with bodily fluids or contaminated surfaces. This makes contact tracing and isolation so effective. It’s much more difficult to contain a disease like the flu that spreads through the air.
  • People are infectious only when they are ill.  Update 3/24/15: (except for the semen of male survivors). There is no indication that there are “Typhoid Marys” who can transmit Ebola without themselves falling ill, except for one instance in which a male survivor appears to have infected his partner, presumably through semen, which is known to contain Ebola virus for several months after recovery. [NYT 3/24/15] This will make the disease a bit more difficult to eradicate, but is not cause for panic. As noted above, the fact that just one infection of this type has come to light suggests that this mode of transmission is infrequent. Additionally, now that an example exists one might expect many “discordant couples” (in which the male is a survivor and the female is not) to use condoms, which should further reduce the risk. One question that calls for further research is how long the virus can persist in the semen of a male survivor, and whether a negative semen test is sufficient to make unprotected intercourse safe for the survivor’s partners.

For these reasons I think it’s highly unlikely that Ebola will become endemic based on human-to-human transmission (absent mutation). So long as we don’t lose focus I expect that Sierra Leone, and eventually Guinea, will be able to end this epidemic using the standard techniques of contact tracing, isolation, funeral management and education.

The Wild Animal Reservoir

In one important respect Ebola already is endemic to East Africa: For forty years it has jumped every few years from its wild animal reservoir (probably fruit bats) into a human population. Just this year an unrelated Ebola outbreak in a rural area of Uganda flared briefly and was extinguished. [CDC]  There is every reason to expect this pattern to continue, since:

  1. even when we have a vaccine it will never be feasible to vaccinate the entire relevant population,
  2. contact with infected animals such as bush meat may be reduced through education but can’t be prevented altogether, and
  3. there is no conceivable way to eliminate Ebola from the animal reservoir.

This is too bad, but it’s a bearable situation, since most outbreaks start in remote rural areas, where they can be quickly snuffed out so long as they are detected early and the response is competent and decisive.

So far as we know the West African epidemic arose from a single jump between a wild animal reservoir and a human. There might be some reason why this was an isolated incident that won’t recur. But it seems much more likely that Ebola is now established in a West African animal reservoir, from which it will now jump periodically into humans, the same way it has for decades in East Africa. After the current epidemic is brought under control it will be essential for all West African countries to establish systems for early detection of new Ebola outbreaks, as has long been the case in East Africa.

We’re lucky that infective contacts between humans and the wild animal reservoir are so rare. If Ebola became established in an animal population that lived in closer contact with humans — rats, pigs, or even dogs — animal-human transmissions could be much more frequent. There is no evidence, however, that this is happening. Genetic evidence continues to indicate that the entire West African epidemic was sparked by a single animal-human transmission in Guinea, from a bat to a 2-year-old boy.

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The main purpose of this blog is to analyze Ebola as rationally and dispassionately as possible. In this post, however, I’m going to collect some of the most moving and stirring items I’ve encountered in connection with the West African epidemic. I’ll start with the most ghastly images I’ve seen, then mention some pieces that are harrowing but less horrible, and end with stories that are inspiring and even hopeful. I plan to add to each category as the epidemic develops, with the hope that eventually everything will be added to the final group.

Horror

These are the most dreadful items I’ve read. I don’t recommend reading more than one or two at a time, and if you are at all squeamish just skip to the next section.

Disorder

Cultural Damage

Survival

Inspiration

Hope

Note: Thanks to the EbolaReport blog for collecting several of these items.

Like sparks from a burning building, travelers are carrying Ebola around the world. What’s been happening? What will happen? What can we do?

The Ebola Diaspora

People travel for lots of reasons, some related to the epidemic, some not.

  • Now as always people will want to travel for business, tourism, or to spend time with family or friends. With Ebola increasingly out of control more and more of the people traveling from West Africa will turn out to be infected. I’ll address later in this post the idea of stopping travel altogether, but in short it wouldn’t work, except perhaps to delay the inevitable.
  • As life becomes more difficult in the affected countries people will have an additional reason to travel, seeking either a temporary respite or an extended or permanent refuge. If things get really bad this could change from a trickle to a panicky exodus.
  • People who have been exposed to Ebola, but are not yet symptomatic, may have a special incentive to travel to a country with a modern healthcare system. Such passengers also have a strong incentive to lie about their Ebola exposure, as the traveler from Liberia to Texas apparently did. [CNN 10/3/14] This could be a particular problem for developed Western countries, but also for more prosperous African countries such as Nigeria and South Africa.
  • Fever monitors in airports should prove to be an effective method of barring symptomatic patients from air travel. Update 10/6/14: It has been suggested that ibuprofen could be used to hide a person’s fever in order to get a symptomatic patient through airport screening. [Reuters 10/3/14]  I don’t know whether this is true, but if so it would be a weakness in the screening process.
  • Symptomatic patients may still slip across porous borders on the ground, but airport controls somewhat reduce the spread of Ebola and nearly eliminate the already-low risk to the airplane’s crew and passengers. Port authorities in the affected countries and their neighbors are attempting to do the same type of screening of ship’s crews. [AFP 9/29/14]

The bottom line is that people infected with Ebola will travel to other countries, on the ground and by air and by sea. Wherever they go they will fall ill, and potentially infect others, setting off local Ebola outbreaks. Everything will depend on the location and the response. Stable countries with capable healthcare systems and effective governments should be able to snuff out their Ebola outbreaks fairly easily, depending on the the level of noncompliance they encounter. Poor countries with crowded slums and limited healthcare may not be so lucky.

What’s Been Happening?

Apart from medical evacuations we know of just three cases in which someone infected with Ebola traveled outside of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Nigeria – Patrick Sawyer

Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian-American diplomat, traveled on July 20 from Monrovia to Lagos via Togo despite having severe Ebola symptoms, including vomiting repeatedly during his flights. He collapsed in the airport and was taken to a hospital where he died a few days later, but not before infecting half a dozen people who themselves went on to infect a dozen more. Nigeria identified and tracked 894 contacts of Sawyer and other infected people, of which 20 came down with Ebola and 8 died. [Washington Post 9/30/14] Details are in my earlier posts: Arrogance and Privilege Imperil Nigeria’s Attempt to Contain Ebola and How Contagious is Ebola?

This story involves multiple instances of noncompliance with quarantine orders and lying, as well as many cases in which hospital staff were unnecessarily infected. Nevertheless, Nigeria’s persistent contact tracing and isolation measures, and capable healthcare system, eventually brought the outbreak (apparently) to a close.

Senegal – A Guinean Student

A 21-year-old student named Mamadou Alimuo Diallo was under surveillance in Guinea because several relatives had fallen ill with Ebola. He nevertheless traveled by car to Dakar, Senegal, despite the fact that the border between Guinea and Senegal was supposed to be closed. He arrived in Dakar on August 20, and stayed in the large household of his uncle. He began feeling ill on the 23rd and went to a medical facility seeking treatment for fever, diarrhea and vomiting, but concealed his contact with Ebola patients, and was sent back to his uncle’s home. He was eventually admitted to a hospital for Ebola treatment on the 26th. [USNews 9/1/14]  Some 67 people with whom the student had been in contact were monitored, but none came down with the disease. The student recovered and returned to Guinea. [Modern Ghana 9/10/14]

Senegal apparently did a good job of contact tracing but really just got lucky, since this situation illustrated a lot of problems:

  • The student broke quarantine in Guinea.
  • The student was able to get into Senegal despite the fact that the border was supposedly closed.
  • The student lied about contact with Ebola patients on the 23rd, putting medical staff and family members at risk by going back to his uncle’s home.

It may be that Senegal’s medical facilities used better precautions than those in other countries, or it may be that the student was for some reason just not very infectious. But you couldn’t even call this an outbreak since there was no transmission of the virus in Senegal.

Dallas – Thomas E. Duncan

Thomas Duncan is a Liberian who traveled by plane from Monrovia to Dallas, Texas, arriving on Sept. 20. He lied on an exit form which asked whether he had had any contact with Ebola patients, since on Sept. 15 he had helped carry a stricken neighbor back into her apartment (after she had been turned away from a hospital). His temperature was taken at the Monrovia airport but was not elevated. [NYT 10/2/14]  On the 24th he developed symptoms and on the 26th went to the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas. Although he told hospital staff that he had recently traveled from Liberia this information didn’t reach the diagnostic team and they sent him home. Update 10/4/14: The hospital has changed its story and admitted that in fact the entire diagnostic team had access to the fact that Duncan came from Liberia. [NYT 10/3/14] Reportedly, however, on his first hospital visit Duncan falsely denied having contact in Liberia with anyone who was ill. [AP 10/2/14]  On the 28th Duncan was taken to the hospital by ambulance and placed in isolation, with laboratory confirmation of Ebola on the 30th. [NYT 9/30/14]

The people at greatest risk were the four people in the apartment where he stayed in Dallas. They were initially told to stay at home, but were “noncompliant,” including sending at least one of their children to school! [Dallas Business Journal 10/2/14] Formal quarantine orders were then issued requiring them to stay home and not to receive visitors, and a police guard was posted. [Yahoo 10/3/14] Bureaucratic snags delayed cleaning of the contaminated apartment for several days after Duncan went into hospital. They subsequently have been moved to a lovely isolated home donated by a member of “a Dallas faith community.” [NYT 10/3/14]

A total of 12 to 18 people are believed to have had direct contact with Duncan, and they may in turn have had contact with around 100 other people. Those with direct contact are being monitored. This includes 5 school-age children. [Dallas Business Journal 10/1/14Updated 10/4/14: About 50 people are being monitored daily, of which 10 had direct contact with Duncan. [CDC 10/4/14]

Lots of mistakes have been made already, and it’s reasonable to guess that several people will pay for them with their lives:

  • Duncan shouldn’t have traveled or stayed with his relatives so soon after his contact with an Ebola patient, and he shouldn’t have lied about it on the exit form.
  • It’s incredibly stupid that the hospital sent Duncan home after he presented with a fever and told them he had come from Liberia.
    • Very possibly inadequate infection prevention procedures were taken while he was in the hospital, which presents a risk that healthcare workers were infected. Patrick Sawyer infected several doctors and nurses and the entire hospital had to be closed for a month-long decontamination! [Africa Independent Television 9/9/14]
    • This also of course increased the risk to the family where he was staying and any other people he contacted over the next couple of days.
  • It’s mind-boggling that students who had direct contact with Duncan might have been sent to school! And the other unstated “noncompliance” by the household where Duncan had been staying is worrisome.
    • Nigeria closed all schools in the entire country at the height of its Ebola outbreak to protect its children!  [BBC 8/27/14]
  • The delay in cleaning the apartment is inept but in point of fact those people are all so thoroughly exposed that it may not make a difference.

Since the mean incubation period is 11 days and Duncan’s symptoms started on Sept. 24 we can expect the first wave of infections in a few days, with hospital staff following a few days later. That’s if he’s as infectious as Patrick Sawyer; if instead he’s like the Senegal student nobody will be infected!

Mali – The Little Girl With a Nosebleed

Added 10/29/14. On October 19 a two-year-old girl was taken by her grandmother on public transport from a funeral in Guinea to Kayes in western Mali, including a two-hour stopover in Bamako, Mali’s capital and largest city. The child had developed a nosebleed in Guinea, so was symptomatic for the entire trip. The child was examined by a healthcare worker on Oct. 20, admitted to a hospital on Oct. 21, tested positive for Ebola on Oct. 23, and died the next day. Initially, some 43 close contacts were monitored, including 10 healthcare providers. [WHO 10/24/14]  This unfortunately has the potential for several to many infections, especially including the healthcare workers. The silver lining is the fact that the initial case was — eventually — identified, so her contacts could be traced. “If you have one case very early on and you catch it, you’re actually lucky,” says [Dr. Samba Sow from the National Center for Disease Control, CNAM, in Bamako] “If you don’t detect that first case you run the risk of people who are contagious staying in the community without being reported and that’s when you run the risk of an epidemic.” [VoA 10/29/14] At last report 82 contacts were being monitored. [Reuters 10/28/14]

Update 10/31/14: It now appears that the little girl traveled on buses and taxis or otherwise had contact with 141 people, of whom 57 have not yet been identified and found. [Reuters 10/31/14] This could be a disaster for Mali, or wherever those people were going. Or the day could be saved once again by the limited contagiousness of the Ebola virus.

What Will Happen?

Travelers infected with Ebola will continue to pop up from time to time, all over the world. The outcome in each case will depend on intelligence, resources, compliance with quarantines and luck.

  • One assumes that the resources available will enable developed countries to stop Ebola fairly quickly. The classic technique of isolation, contact tracing and monitoring has worked in dozens of rural outbreaks as well as in Nigeria, despite serious noncompliance. 
  • This should be true in Dallas, despite stupidity at the hospital and noncompliance by the family which have increased risk, and may cause unnecessary deaths.
  • The real problem is when Ebola pops up in a poor country with a weak healthcare system, especially in a crowded slum, and especially when there are endemic diseases like malaria that can cause similar symptoms. If Ebola gets established in such a situation it could become another Liberia.

Update 10/6/14: Northeastern University researcher Alessandro Vespignani has developed a computer model which predicted, as of Oct. 1, the likelihood of an infected person traveling to particular countries over the first three weeks of October. [Boston Globe 10/1/14] The ten countries with the highest probabilities are, in order: Ghana (46%), France, Senegal, U.S. (25%), Ivory Coast, U.K., Nigeria, Mali, Belgium and Morocco (about 10%). Of course the U.S. has already identified one such traveler, but it would seem that we still have about a one in four chance of encountering another by the end of the month. One question which isn’t clear from the article is whether the investigators took into account the possibility of a travel bias towards countries with good healthcare systems by people who are concerned about the possibility of having been exposed to the virus. The investigators are posting updating predictions at this link: Ebola – MoBS.

As noted above, the big concern is when one of these people arrives in a poor country with a weak healthcare system. The biggest worry is Ghana, followed by Senegal, Ivory Coast, Mali and Morocco. Nigeria is also high on the list but they showed considerable skill in quashing the Patrick Sawyer outbreak so may be somewhat less at risk (unless the virus gets loose in the ungovernable northern region). The slums of India or South America would also be quite vulnerable but the likelihood of travel there is much less.

What Can We Do?

There are just a few things we can — and must — do.

Limit Travel From Affected Countries?

There will no doubt be a move in America to bar travelers from the three affected countries (Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone). This has a superficial appeal, on the same reasoning as the cordon sanitaire around an epidemic ravaged city. (This is discussed in an earlier post: Ebola Quarantines) WHO takes the view, however, that travel bans are counter-productive. [AlJazeera 9/22/14] Not only do travel bans have detrimental economic consequences, but they can worsen the epidemic itself by hindering relief efforts. 
This article makes the case rather persuasively:

It’s also questionable how effective a travel ban would be. The Guinean student demonstrated how porous African land borders are, even when theoretically “closed.” Someone who really wanted to leave the affected countries could get out. Rich and privileged people may have multiple passports, that could be used to conceal their nationalities and/or their itineraries. And there would always have to be exceptions, of one sort or another. A ban might slow the process of seeding Ebola all around the world, but it wouldn’t altogether stop it. Update 10/6/14: The Northeastern University computer model mentioned above elegantly quantifies this. Even with an 80% reduction in flights from the affected countries the probability of an infected person arriving in a given country is only delayed by 3 to 4 weeks. [MoBS Lab 10/1/14]

Update 10/6/14: Despite the arguments against it, I see two possible reasons why a travel ban may nevertheless happen: (1) it may be forced on politicians by a panicky electorate, and/or (2) the numbers of infected travelers may become excessive, due either to a general exodus or medical tourism by people who suspect (or know) that they are infected.

The five-day Hajj (Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca) started on Oct. 2. Saudi Arabia denied visas to residents of the three West African countries, and asked travelers to fill out a medical screening form that details their travels for the previous three weeks. [BBC 10/2/14] Of course people may lie, but it certainly is to be hoped that this year’s Hajj at least will be Ebola-free.

Quarantine Arriving Travelers

Travelers from suspect countries could be quarantined for 21 days before being allowed into the country. This is a tried and true Medieval technique but it’s a really poor fit with our fast-paced globalized world. A non-starter.

Continue to Screen Travelers

Thomas Duncan’s temperature was taken at the Monrovia airport as part of the screening system put in place following the Patrick Sawyer debacle. This part of the process worked as intended, to keep symptomatic travelers off planes. He was asked all the right questions; though unfortunately he lied. This sort of screening is the best you can do, and it’s helpful, even though it can’t prevent pre-symptomatic people like Duncan from traveling.

It would be helpful to add arrival screening of people who have been in affected countries (or U.S. states!) but it’s difficult to identify those people and it would be a huge project to screen everyone on arrival.

Be Prepared

Healthcare providers all over the world must be alert to the possibility of Ebola. In this case Duncan didn’t lie about coming from Liberia (although there’s no indication he told anyone about his contact with an Ebola patient) but there was a lapse in communication within the hospital. This sort of mistake can be fatal! Both to healthcare providers and others who may be needlessly exposed when an Ebola patient is sent home.

Poor countries with weak healthcare systems must be especially vigilant to spot any unusual patterns of disease or death before Ebola has a chance to get intrenched.

There’s not much we can do as individuals, except perhaps to practice good general hygiene, including frequent hand washing. Oh, and if someone is visiting from West Africa feel free to ask whether they’ve had close contact with Ebola patients in the last three weeks…

End the Epidemic

The only definitive solution is to end the West African epidemic. In addition to compelling humanitarian reasons we need to wipe out Ebola everywhere (in humans, anyway) in order to feel fully safe in our own lives.

In April, early in the West African epidemic, the New York Times published an Op-Ed piece entitled “Ebola Virus: A Grim, African Reality.” It closed with this paragraph:

Ebola in Guinea is not the Next Big One, an incipient pandemic destined to circle the world, as some anxious observers might imagine. It’s a very grim and local misery, visited upon a small group of unfortunate West Africans, toward whom we should bow in sympathy and continue sending help. It’s not about our fears and dreads. It’s about them.

I felt then as I feel now: Ebola is not just an African problem, it’s a human problem.

Quarantine has always been a principal weapon against epidemics: isolate ailing people so they cannot spread illness. Quarantines come in various types, however, which have different effects:

  1. When an individual falls ill they need to be cared for in a facility that minimizes the risk that the virus will be spread to other susceptible people. This is the medical isolation that has been the key to defeating all past Ebola outbreaks. People who are suspected of having Ebola may also be kept isolated from others until their status becomes clear. I’ll call this a precautionary quarantine. A third situation is when a contact of an Ebola patient is cautioned to stay at home, or not to travel, during the 21-day incubation period. I’ll call this a monitoring quarantine.
  2. When an entire neighborhood or region is blocked off, the barrier is referred to by the French term, cordon sanitaire. This may be an urban neighborhood, such as the poor West Point district of Monrovia, or an entire region, such as the remote area at the intersection of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Or it may be a de facto cordon sanitaire imposed by the closing of borders and the discontinuance of transport links.
  3. It is also possible to impose a curfew that limits when people can interact outside the home, in the hope that this will reduce transmission.
  4. Finally, Sierra Leone has announced a nationwidewide three-day lock-down, starting September 19, during which everyone will be required to stay home so as to allow a house to house inspection for hidden Ebola patients. [AFP 9/6/14]

Medical isolation is essential and effective, though in West Africa there have been many issues:

  • Some rural “red” villages either doubted that Ebola is real or feared that the doctors brought it. They forced Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (“MSF”) to withdraw, and in some cases physically blocked road access — a do-it-yourself (reverse) cordon sanitaire! [NYT 7/27/14]  There was no choice but to let the epidemic burn itself out in those villages. I haven’t seen a report of what happened, but it will be illuminating to eventually find out.
  • Urban neighborhoods have resisted siting of Ebola care facilities nearby. Residents of the poor West Point district of Monrovia attacked and ransacked a holding facility [NYT 8/19/14], which lead to the attempted cordon sanitaire around their entire neighborhood described below.
  • People who fear letting ill family members go into Ebola care facilities often try to treat them at home, hiding them from authorities. This increases the risk of infection to home caregivers as well as other family members. Concern about this issue has led Sierra Leone to declare the country-wide lock down described below.
  • There aren’t enough beds in Ebola care facilities, at least in Monrovia. Medical isolation fails if there’s nowhere for people to go. It’s not clear how it will be possible to get on top of this issue since the epidemic is growing exponentially and the construction of facilities — and especially provision of trained staff — is not.

Precautionary quarantines and monitoring quarantines are also essential elements of infection control. The main problem I’ve noticed there is the issue of people breaking quarantine and subsequently infecting some or many other people. The experience of Nigeria is horrific: the outbreak started with one man who broke quarantine in Liberia to fly to Lagos, but it was spread by a series of additional quarantine breakers, one after another. See my earlier post: Arrogance and Privilege Imperil Nigeria’s Attempt to Contain Ebola

On August 1, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone announced a regional cordon sanitaire, to be enforced by their military forces, around the remote area where the outbreak began. The New York Times described it as an infection-control strategy that has not been employed for a century. [NYT 8/12/14] A few days later, however, a writer in the New Republic described as “heartless but effective” a similar cordon sanitaire used in 1995 to control an Ebola outbreak in Zaire. [New Republic 8/14/14] Reuters expressed the concern that the cordon could create abandoned “plague villages.” [Reuters 8/17/14]  The World Food program has been struggling to provide adequate food supplies to 1.3 million people in limited access areas, including classic quarantines as well as cordons sanitaire. [WFP 9/2/14] There has been little mention of the regional cordon sanitaire in recent weeks, perhaps because the battle in the capital cities has taken center stage. The regional cordon may simply become a dead letter if Ebola continues to spread outside it.

On August 20, Liberia imposed urban cordons sanitaire on two poor and crowded neighborhoods of Monrovia: West Point and Dolo Town. Hundreds of young men in West Point rioted, throwing rocks at police, who used tear gas and live gunfire to disperse the crowd. [SaharaReporters 8/21/14] Several residents were injured, and a 15-year-old boy died. During the closure there were many stories of evasion, including a couple who bribed a soldier $10 to get out and a man who swam around the cordon each weekday to go to work in a government office. Ten days later the West Point cordon was lifted. [NYT 8/29/14] The West Point cordon would have to be called a failure. Meanwhile Dolo Town had accepted the restriction more calmly, although grumbling was reported three weeks later about continuing to be an “Ebola Jail Town.” [AFP 9/7/14]

Liberia also imposed a nationwide curfew on August 20, from 6 pm to 9 am. [AFP 8/20/14]  There has been a report that nighttime armed burglaries have increased during the curfew. [The New Dawn Liberia 9/8/14] The value of the curfew is debatable. It depends on the importance of urban transmission modes, and how many potential transmission events are prevented by keeping people home at night.

A de facto cordon sanitaire around the entire region has been developing over the past couple of months through a series of border closings and flight suspensions, along with regulations barring entry to ships that had touched at ports in the affected countries. In the past week a plea has been made for flights to continue and for borders to be opened to screened transit. It will become increasingly difficult to get necessary materiel and personnel into the affected countries if transport restrictions aren’t eased.

Most recently, Sierra Leone has announced a three-day nationwide lockdown, starting Sept. 19, during which everyone is expected to stay in their homes, with exceptions only for essential travel. During this period a house-to-house inspection will be conducted to find patients that are being hidden from the authorities. A government spokesman is quoted as saying that, “We intend to ensure that the dreaded disease is checked.” [AFP 9/6/14] MSF has expressed concern that this sort of measure will do more harm than good: “It has been our experience that lockdowns and quarantines do not help control Ebola, as they end up driving people underground and jeopardizing the trust between people and health providers…” But the top U.N. official in Sierra Leone supported the idea. [NYT 9/6/14] My own view is that the idea is daring but a lot could go wrong:

  • Households that are concealing an Ebola patient are likely to resist a thorough inspection, thus frustrating the purpose.
  • Even if a household doesn’t harbor an Ebola patient, it may have some other secret that will lead it to resist inspection.
  • People who are angry anyway will have three full days to sit at home and get angrier and angrier. This could burst out into violence.
  • How will the inspectors distinguish people who just have malaria or colds from people who really do have Ebola?
  • Will the inspectors all be wearing full protective gear, and will they be trained in procedures for putting them on and taking them off? The arrival of a moon-suited team would not be a warm and fuzzy experience, but if they aren’t protected the inspectors themselves could be the next wave of victims.
  • If a lot of patients are found where will they go? I’m not sure about the situation in Sierra Leone, but in Monrovia there aren’t nearly enough beds in Ebola treatment facilities. [WSJ 9/7/14]

All that said, a desperate situation calls for desperate measures. I hope the lockdown works!

 

 

What can be done? This post will make some suggestions.

1. The first priority is to reduce the rate of transmission through known channels, which I discussed in detail in my previous post, The Ebola Chain Reaction.

Home Caregivers. Education is the first need: people need to know Ebola’s symptoms, then they need to know what to do if someone in their household starts to display them. This is an extremely hard problem. The early symptoms of Ebola — fever, vomiting and diarrhea — are indistinguishable from many other endemic diseases. Every person with a fever can’t be taken immediately to the hospital, and in the meantime the home caregiver is in no position to use any semblance of anti-infection protocol. In a crowded household people share the same spaces for eating, sleeping and every other aspect of life. Practical advice for home caregivers needs to be developed and communicated. That advice should include how a patient can be cared for in the home with reduced risk, when a patient should be taken to a clinic or hospital and how to decontaminate living spaces after a patient has left. But I don’t see how the risk of transmission to other members of a household can be much reduced, especially in poor, crowded housholds.

Healthcare Providers. Sooner or later — hopefully sooner — a symptomatic patient will be brought to a clinic or hospital. Again and again patients have infected multiple hospital staff members, and even forced the hospital to close for decontamination. As the numbers of patients increase this cannot be allowed to continue. Emergency rooms must be organized and staffed so that an Ebola patient can be identified and isolated without endangering staff or other patients. That’s easy to say but really hard to make true. Can we expect emergency room staff to wear bio-hazard suits? Can each patient be kept apart from other patients until they have been assessed? And again the problem arises of distinguishing early stage Ebola from other diseases. A quick, cheap and accurate test is needed to enable healthcare providers to distinguish who does or doesn’t present an Ebola risk. Airports are starting to use infrared detectors to cull out people who are running fevers, but it’s hard to imagine similar gear being deployed to all the relevant hospitals and clinics, and even if someone has a fever a hospital — unlike an airport — can’t just turn the patient away; but knowing who does and doesn’t have a fever might be helpful. And of course healthcare providers need the training and gear necessary to safely care for Ebola patients.

Traditional Funeral Practices. African funeral practices spread infection widely and must be suspended. This is a very difficult problem, since funerals are one of the ways people deal with the powerful emotion of grief. They will resist changes, and unless physically prevented are likely to model the behaviors they have seen and performed in the past. Culturally-specific strategies must be devised and implemented to encourage people to mourn Ebola victims in ways that do not place them at risk of infection.

These three transmission modes are quite capable of keeping the epidemic growing, with an Effective Reproduction Rate (Re) of more than one (as discussed in my last post). Pushing each of them down as low as possible is the first priority.

2. New modes of transmission are possible in the urban environment. Prior outbreaks have all been in rural areas, so there is no past experience with the additional ways Ebola can spread in a city, especially in crowded areas.

The first question is how important any new urban modes of transmission are, i.e. how much of a contribution they make to Re. If any urban mode of transmission is comparable to the known modes it needs to get similar priority, but if urban modes of transmission are more theoretical than real they can be deprioritized. The contact tracing process generates a tremendous amount of information about exactly what kinds of contacts did and did not lead to infection. Contact tracing information from all countries should be collected and analyzed, and conclusions should be shared amongst Ebola fighters. Communications to the public should generally be accurate, but in the public interest may not always be “the whole truth.” Significant modes of urban transmission that are so identified must be countered, if possible.

Even before data is available it makes sense to analyze urban life and make changes that seem logical and have the potential of being cost-effective.

  • Replacing shaking hands with fist bumps is a step in the right direction, although elbow bumps or just bows would be even better. Air kisses between friends and colleagues (if that was ever an African thing) can be suspended for the duration.
  • Situations where people are crowded into direct contact are part of urban life, but present an obvious risk. People can be cautioned to avoid crowds and steps can be taken to reduce crowding in taxis and buses. Update 9/8/14: This chilling item from the Wall Street Journal suggests that taxi drivers and surfaces in taxis could easily become contaminated by bleeding, etc. Ebola patients. [WSJ 9/7/14]
  • While 60% alcohol hand sanitizer is better than nothing the CDC recommendation is to wash hands with soap and water whenever possible. Sanitizer could have an adverse effect if people use it instead of washing. There is also a question of whether alcohol has much effect on the virus anyway. Update 10/7/14: Since Ebola has a lipid coat alcohol-based hand sanitizer should be effective against it. The CDC continues to recommend alcohol-based hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol) when hand washing isn’t possible. [CDC 10/7/14] Bleach is standard for disinfection, but it’s not clear to me whether dipping ones hands in a shared bleach bucket, as is becoming common in some affected cities, is a net benefit.
  • Some offices are taking people’s temperatures when they enter, and asking them to wear it as a badge. The risk of transmission in an office setting would seem to be very low in any case, but if this serves to raise awareness and control anxiety it may be worthwhile.
  • Closing schools initially seems logical, but it imposes social costs and might turn out to be an overreaction. School children are somewhere doing something, probably with other children, when they aren’t in school. It might actually be better to open school, with provisions to minimize physical contact, and perhaps also with a process for taking each student’s temperature as they arrive and sending home anyone with a fever.
  • Other situations in which people put their hands on one another deserve consideration. Massage parlors and sexual contact come to mind. And a panicky post worries about barber shops (not without reason).

Amongst all these possible risks and countermeasures, public communications should focus on the most important transmission modes and the most important countermeasures, based on the best available information at each point. On the other hand, worthless countermeasures, or countermeasures against trivial risks, may be ignored if they afford comfort and don’t unduly draw attention or resources away from more important issues, or lead to a dangerously false sense of security.

3. Superstition, rumors and mistrust must be countered and overcome. The West African Ebola fight has been plagued by these factors from the outset. In addition to the usual superstitions about causes and folk remedies the rumor spread that Ebola was brought by the healthcare personnel who were in fact trying to stop it. MSF had to withdraw from more than two dozen “red villages” because this hostility made them too dangerous. The poor and crowded West Point district of Monrovia attacked and ransacked a quarantine facility that had been sited there. In part this reflected “Ebola denial” which will disappear on its own as the epidemic makes itself felt more widely. But it also reflected mistrust and irrational fear that must be countered.

4. A pattern of quarantine breaking and lying must be broken. Again and again, especially among the privileged classes in Nigeria, people have broken quarantine and/or lied about prior contacts with Ebola cases, thereby putting dozens or hundreds of health care providers and other contacts at risk. (For details see my post, Arrogance and Privilege Imperil Nigeria’s Attempt to Contain Ebola) This reflects arrogance and a habit of getting their own way regardless of consequences to others. The immorality of this behavior — and its dire consequences — must be brought home to everyone, at every level of society. This is culturally-specific but one imagines that achieving this goal might involve use of media and involvement of religious and other thought leaders. It is hard to see how Nigeria — or indeed any society, including developed countries — can control Ebola if a pattern of quarantine breaking and lying like the one we have seen so far should persist.

5. Adequate healthcare facilities are essential to allow Ebola patients to be cared for outside the home, where they are much more likely to pass the virus along to others. The epidemic has consistently outstripped available facilities, and unless there is a marvelous international intervention this seems doomed to continue. Healthcare is also key to minimizing the death rate, which is important as a humanitarian matter even though it is only tangentially relevant to stopping the epidemic. Sadly, there is no possibility of replicating the level of care the two Americans received at Emory, which no doubt contributed to their recoveries. But any lessons learned in developed hospitals about how best to manage Ebola patients should be made available to African healthcare providers. Most important are any recommendations that it might be possible to implement in an overstressed and impoverished facility.

Updated 10/7/14: Here is a new idea that might make an important contribution, even though it’s really distasteful. Sierra Leone plans to build up to 1,000 “makeshift Ebola clinics” that would offer little, if any, treatment. [AP 10/2/14] These “clinics” would really be hospices which would let people die and be safely cremated or buried without infecting their families. It’s dreadful to think of abandoning people who could be saved with minimal care. But just at the moment this may be the least bad alternative, since if the patients die at home they will very likely infect their caretakers and some or all of the other members of their households. If enough of these facilities could be provided, and if people could be persuaded to use them, this could be a game changer.

6. Outsiders must send money, health care and infection control materials, healthcare workers and healthcare trainers. Happily — if far too late — the world finally seems to be waking up to the gravity of the situation, and to its own moral obligation to help, as well as its self-interest in stopping the epidemic before it affects even more countries. Individual readers can find a list of ways to help at the current Ebola Report post. Charity Navigator can help you assess the quality of charities that are fighting the epidemic. Doctors Without Borders USA, for example (the U.S. branch of Médecins Sans Frontières) gets the highest ratings for both use of funds and accountability/transparency.

7. Immunity is the ultimate weapon against disease, and in this case it may be the only way the epidemic can be stopped. Obviously, testing of a vaccine must be given top priority. People who have recovered from Ebola are also an important resource. It might be possible to recruit recovered Ebola patients to play roles in healthcare settings, such as hospital emergency rooms, or in other situations where their immunity could come in handy. Recovered patients may also offer a source of antibodies that could be purified as a serum to help current victims. Mutation is the ultimate weapon of disease, and this could undercut both a vaccine and survivor immunity, but as to this possibility we just have to hope for the best.